Concurrent Planning V-W

Virginia

Concurrent Planning for Permanency for Children

To better understand this issue and to view it across States, download the PDF (781 KB) of this publication.

Current Through November 2016

 

Concurrent planning is a practice that facilitates permanency planning for children in foster care. The definition of concurrent planning is a structured approach to case management that requires working towards family reunification while, at the same time, establishing and working toward an alternative permanency plan. Concurrent planning should be used for all foster care cases to ensure that if reunification cannot be achieved within the timeframe permitted by law, the child will still achieve permanency promptly.

In most cases, the concurrent plan will be placement with a relative with subsequent transfer of custody or adoption. The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) allows the local Department of Social Services (LDSS) to engage in concurrent planning while making reasonable efforts to reunite the family. Concurrent planning replaces sequential planning in foster care by simultaneously exploring possible relative options and/or identifying a resource family that can serve as both a foster and adoptive family to a child.

ASFA requires that once an agency files a petition to terminate parental rights (TPR), it begins the process of recruiting, identifying, and approving an adoptive home for the child. LDSS service workers should not wait until the TPR order is final to begin adoption recruitment. The intent of concurrent planning is to reduce delays in finding permanent homes for children. Service workers do not have to eliminate one goal before working toward another for a child.

 

 

The desired outcomes from concurrent planning are decreased length of stay in foster care, fewer placement moves, and fewer children in long-term foster care. These outcomes help maintain continuity of care for children and, thus, healthier attachments to caregivers.

The goal of concurrent permanency planning is to assure that children are in safe, permanent homes as quickly as is consistent with their health, safety, and well-being, while recognizing the urgency caused by the child’s sense of time.

 

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Washington

Concurrent Planning for Permanency for Children

To better understand this issue and to view it across States, download the PDF (781 KB) of this publication.

Current Through November 2016

 

The permanency plan shall include a permanency plan of care that shall identify one of the following outcomes as a primary goal and may identify additional outcomes as alternative goals:

  • Return of the child to the home of the child’s parent, guardian, or legal custodian
  • Adoption, including a Tribal customary adoption as defined in § 13.38.040
  • Guardianship
  • Permanent legal custody
  •  Long-term relative or foster care, if the child is between age 16 and 18, with a written agreement between the parties and the care provider
  • Successful completion of a responsible living skills program
  • Independent living, if appropriate and if the child is age 16 or older

The plan shall state whether both in-State and, where appropriate, out-of-State placement options have been considered by the Department of Social and Health Services or supervising agency.

 

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West Virginia

Concurrent Planning for Permanency for Children

To better understand this issue and to view it across States, download the PDF (781 KB) of this publication.

Current Through November 2016

 

The term ‘permanency plan’ refers to that part of the case plan that is designed to achieve a permanent home for the child in the least restrictive setting available. The plan must document efforts to ensure that the child is returned home within approximate time lines for reunification as set out in the plan. Reasonable efforts to place a child for adoption or with a legal guardian should be made at the same time, or concurrent with, reasonable efforts to prevent removal or to make it possible for a child to return to the care of his or her parent(s) safely. If reunification is not the permanency plan for the child, the plan must state why reunification is not appropriate and detail the alternative, concurrent permanent placement plans for the child to include approximate time lines for when the placement is expected to become a permanent placement. This case plan shall serve as the family case plan for parents of abused or neglected children.

 

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Wisconsin

Concurrent Planning for Permanency for Children

To better understand this issue and to view it across States, download the PDF (781 KB) of this publication.

Current Through November 2016

 

A county department, the Department of Children and Families in a county having a population of 750,000 or more, or the agency primarily responsible for providing services to a child under a court order shall determine, in accordance with standards established by the department, whether to engage in concurrent planning. If, according to those standards, concurrent planning is required, the county department, department, or agency shall engage in concurrent planning unless the court or permanency review panel determines under § 48.38(5)(c)5m that concurrent planning is inappropriate.

In this subsection, ‘concurrent planning’ means appropriate efforts to work simultaneously towards achieving more than one of the permanency goals listed in § 48.38(4)(fg), 1 to 5, for a child who is placed in out-of-home care and for whom a permanency plan is required.

 

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Wyoming

Concurrent Planning for Permanency for Children

To better understand this issue and to view it across States, download the PDF (781 KB) of this publication.

Current Through November 2016

 

Reasonable efforts to place a child for adoption or with a legal guardian may be made concurrently with the reasonable efforts to reunify the family.

 

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  • showme on February 9, 2021 @ 21:53:47

This post was created by support on January 1, 2021.